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Hi everyone, I’ll be hitting the road this summer to meet readers and sign copies of Paleo Takeout. Along the way, I’ll be teaming up with some of my favorite authors. Read below for the details, and be sure to RSVP for the event so I know how many folks to expect.

Please bear in mind that while I’d love to add more dates and locations, due to my day job, this is likely all the travel I’ll be able to manage this summer (I am working to squeeze in one more date, more info on that soon!). I’ll be adding more information on each event as I confirm the details; for now, you can periodically check my Events page as the events near.

If you know of a great location in one of the cities below that doesn’t have a firm venue booked, I’d love to hear your suggestions. It’s surprisingly hard to get book stores to do signings, so any help you can provide (like asking your local shop to host my signing) would be very helpful, thank you!

If you’re not able to make it one of the signings, never fear – if you call FoxTale Book Shoppe at (770) 516-9989 before June 27th, you can order a copy of the book and I’ll sign and personalize it for you during my signing at their Atlanta shop, and they’ll ship it anywhere in the US! Okay, on to the dates.

June 19th – Pensacola, FL (more info) I’ll be at SoGourmet Pensacola and cooking dinner using dishes from the book, which will include Egg Drop Soup, Cauliflower Rice, Sweet and Sour Chicken, Kung Pao Pork, Vegetables in White Sauce. I’ll be also throwing together a Rice Pudding dessert from The Ancestral Table. Be sure to pre-pay for the event, and I’ll see you there – lots of fun (and wine) to be had!

June 23rd – Pensacola, FL (more info) Come by and get a signed copy of Paleo Takeout on the day it releases! I’ll be doing a small, informal celebration/signing at my local Barnes & Noble.

June 27th – Atlanta, GA (more info) This is my official book release party, with special guest (and Atlantan) Sarah Ballantyne in attendance! We’re going to have all sorts of fermented drinks, plus a broth tasting featuring broths and soup bases from Paleo Takeout, made by yours truly!

July 9th – Seattle, WA (more info) I’ll be returning to my home state of Washington and co-signing with Ciarra Hannah (author of The Frugal Paleo Cookbook) and Jenny Castaneda (author of One-Pot Paleo).

July 10th – Portland, OR (more info) with Mickey Trescott (author of The Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook) and Jenny Castaneda (author of One-Pot Paleo).

July 12th – San Francisco, CA (more info) with Simone Miller (author of The Zenbelly Cookbook) and Jenny Castaneda (author of One-Pot Paleo). Simone will be bringing snacks!

July 18th – Los Angeles, CA (more info) with Jenny Castaneda (author of One-Pot Paleo).

July 25th – Denver, CO (more info)

August 1st – Boston, MA (more info)

August 7th – Washington DC (more info) with Matthew McCarry and Stacy Toth, authors of Real Life Paleo, Beyond Bacon, and Eat Like a Dinosaur

August 8th – New York City, NY (more info)

August 15th – Austin, TX (more info) with Jenni Hulet (author of My Paleo Patisserie and Joshua Weissman (author of The Slim Palate cookbook. This event is going to be super fun, hosted by Picnik Austin; $30 admission includes a full-course dinner featuring catered dishes from Paleo Takeout!

August 21st – Chicago, IL (more info)

August 22nd – Kansas City, MO (more info)

Boerenkool Stamppot is a Dutch dish of mashed potatoes (“stomped pot”) mixed with kale. There are sometimes other vegetables mixed into Stamppot, like sauerkraut or endive, but as the Dutch say, “Boerenkool is het nieuwe zwart” (Kale is the new black). Note: they probably don’t actually say that! Either way, it’s worth it to incorporate the most nutrient dense vegetable on the planet into the dish.

Stamppot is typically served with a mild smoked sausage called rookworst, either sliced and mixed into the dish like in my pictures, or served on top of the vegetables. It’s all going to get mixed up in your stomach anyway, so feel free to arrange it as you please.

Here’s something really exciting about the photo you see above – I live-broadcasted my photography session! I started using the Periscope app (available on iOS and Android), which lets you livestream just about anything you want, and people can re-watch the broadcast for the next 24 hours. Think of it like a spontaneous YouTube. I think I’ll be using it on the weekends while photographing or cooking my recipes for the blog; it’s a neat way to interact with you folks (you can send chat messages to me while I’m working). Join me if you’re interested – my username is, predictably, thedomesticman.

Oh! And some more cool news. My presentation from Paleo f(x) 2014 was officially released on YouTube. Honestly, I had forgotten all about it so it was a neat surprise to see it appear online yesterday. Click here to watch me talk about six ways to improve the quality of Paleo-minded cooking; the talk is called “Our Great-Grandparents Were Totally Paleo: Six Suggestions for Improving Paleo Cuisine by Following Traditional and Gourmet Culinary Practices” (what a mouthful!). I’ve also embedded it at the bottom of this post.

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I was recently approached by Sharp to try out their new convection microwave as part of a challenge to rethink the way we cook with microwaves. Initially, I kept thinking about those disastrous microwave cookbooks from the 1980s and 1990s (this one might be the best example of all time), but after a bit of reading I decided to take them up on the offer. After all, if the telephone can radically change over the course of 10 years, and the Instant Pot can change how we look at pressure cookers, shouldn’t a microwave make some leaps and bounds as well?

I must have been living under a rock, because apparently microwaves can do all sorts of cool things today, and this model is no exception. At its core, this device serves three functions: 1) a standard microwave, 2) a convection oven, and 3) a roaster (with heating elements both on the bottom and top of the microwave). And because the microwave is much smaller than a traditional oven, it preheats much more quickly (it took me five and half minutes to pre-heat it to 400F). I envision this microwave to be an ideal solution for those without the space for a typical oven or as a secondary oven when you have lots of items to bake at once (Thanksgiving comes to mind).

To test the microwave, I decided to try it out on a very standard, traditional recipe: roasted brussels sprouts (with bacon, of course). I first baked the bacon at a convection setting, then roasted the brussels sprouts in the rendered bacon fat using the roaster setting. It worked like a charm – the food cooked evenly and easily, with a texture which is about the opposite of what you’d expect from a microwave (crispy and browned). I also provided conventional (oven) instructions for this recipe below.

The microwave also combines Sharp’s cooking functions to allow you to try different ways of heating food. For example, I reheated the leftover brussels sprouts with a combination of 50% microwave power and 50% roaster (top heating element) and they came out both hot and crispy – not your typical microwave re-heating experience.

I’ll be posting a couple more recipes using this microwave over the course of the next month, so let me know in the comments if you have any questions or anything you’d like me to address in a future recipe.

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Things are really moving with my next cookbook, Paleo Takeout: Restaurant Favorites without the Junk. For starters, the book finished printing last week, and my publisher overnighted a copy to me so I could be one of the first to check it out. I’m very happy with the finished product, and I think you’ll love it too! I’m in the middle of scheduling a summer book tour, and I’ll be sure to share the dates as soon as I have everything arranged – if you haven’t already, be sure to sign up for my brand new weekly newsletter, where I’ll be sharing news and recipes in one convenient little email package.

For this week’s recipe, I wanted to highlight some of the techniques and ingredients that you’ll find in the book, to set the stage for when it releases on June 23rd. This Twice-Cooked Pork dish uses a technique common to Chinese-American takeout restaurants called velveting, where lean meat is thinly sliced, marinated in a starch mixture, then blanched and drained before being added to a stir-fry. Have you ever had some Beef & Broccoli with steak pieces that are super soft and tender? That’s velveting at work.

While this method isn’t absolutely required for any of the recipes for the book, it’s a fun technique that really adds a tasty dynamic to your Asian-inspired dishes. I also tend to start my velveted meat as the first part of the cooking process, so that I can chop my veggies and prepare my stir-fry sauce while the meat is tenderizing – the timing tends to flow naturally that way.

In terms of ingredients, I used this recipe in particular to highlight rice cooking wine (sometimes labeled as Chinese cooking wine or just rice wine) and Sichuan chili peppers (those are the whole dried peppers you’ll find in dishes like General Tso’s Chicken), since both are commonly used in Chinese-American dishes. Similarly, arrowroot starch is commonly used in Paleo Takeout to create a thickening slurry; both potato starch and tapioca starch can be used in a pinch, but I’ve found that arrowroot best mimics the thickening properties of cornstarch.

For a full list of uncommon pantry ingredients that are found in Paleo Takeout, be sure to check out my online shopping guide that lists the ingredients plus how often they appear in the book. Additionally, I’ve set up a similar guide for tools that I used in writing the book.

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Confession time: a couple weeks ago, when a reader requested that I make this dish, I had to look it up because I had never heard of it. Somehow, I had inadvertently avoided Chicken Piccata my whole life. Although truth be told, I rarely visit Italian restaurants any longer since bread, pasta, and pizza all contain that pesky (but delicious) protein, gluten. And after that, what’s left at your typical Italian-American restaurant – salad? Regardless, I did a bit of research on the dish, and here we are.

The origin of this dish isn’t confirmed, but most believe it to be of American design, most likely by Italian-American immigrants during the 1930s. In Italy, Piccatas today are commonly made with veal, but here in the US, chicken prevails. The cutlets are breaded and pan-fried, and then a sauce is made with the drippings. It’s a simple technique made remarkable by its combination of flavors – wine, broth, lemon juice, and capers.

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It must be bundle season! A couple weeks back I shared about the Primal Life Kit, which ended last week, and I’m happy to announce that I’m a part of another bundle, The Autoimmune Wellness Bundle, which came online this morning and is available through the weekend.

I’m particularly fond of one of the (40+) resources available in the bundle, The Best of Autoimmune Protocol 2015 eBook, which collects over 160 recipes from a group of bloggers, myself included.

The eBook features a comprehensive look at the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP), a low-inflammatory version of the Paleo diet designed to reverse autoimmune symptoms. And my favorite part: five of my recipes are featured, all tweaked for the Autoimmune Protocol: Blaukraut (German Red Cabbage), Apple, Bacon, & Duck Breast Salad, Mofongo, Oven Roasted Jerusalem Artichokes, and an AIP-friendly Flatbread.

On a personal note, I’ve been implementing elements of the AIP over the past year and have recently found a significant improvement in my own autoimmune issues. If you or a loved one are dealing with an autoimmune disease, I definitely recommend checking out this resource.

In my new office here in Pensacola Florida, we have an interesting combination of Navy families. Two of my co-workers have spouses they met while stationed in England, and another met his wife while serving in Canada. I’ll often ask them what new dishes they’d like for me to bring into work, as they typically (and unknowingly) are my tasting judges. The question inevitably gets passed to their spouses, and all too often I hear complaints that there are “no good curries” to be found in our town. This Chicken Korma recipe is the result of those conversations.

“Korma” comes from the Urdu word ḳormā, which means to braise. This dish, as with other braised dishes like Rogan Josh, is characteristic of Moghul cuisine, which was first introduced to Northern India by the Mughal Empire in the 16th Century; the Mughal were a predominantly Muslim people of Turko-Mongol descent (some claimed to be direct descendants of Genghis Khan).

There is a lot of variation to kormas, but the underlying theme includes a slow braise in a rich, mildly-spicy curry sauce, often flavored with yogurt or heavy cream. For this recipe in particular, I kept it relatively dairy-free (what’s a recipe without butter or ghee?) and used a bit of lemon juice to impart the tanginess you’d expect from using yogurt.

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Last month I had the opportunity to visit Avery Island, Louisiana, the home of Tabasco. Each year the company selects a group of bloggers to visit their island (which is actually a salt dome surrounded by bayou). In turn, the bloggers are asked to write about their experience and create some recipes using Tabasco sauces. Since I was probably going to make some recipes using Tabasco this year anyway, it was an easy decision to join the event.

I’ve always valued Tabasco sauces for their short ingredients list (the original red pepper sauce contains just three ingredients – peppers, vinegar, and salt), and their ability to add a complex flavor to any dish; I feel that acidity is a tragically underutilized dynamic in most kitchens, and Tabasco has acidity in spades. But until this trip I never realized how much care Tabasco puts into each bottle, which you’ll see in my pictures below the recipe. But first, the food.

It’s coming into flounder season here in Florida, and it is easy to find in my area right now. The fish are caught using a spear (called a “gig”), typically at night, much in the same way that frogs are traditionally caught. A favorite preparation for flounder is to simply pan-fry them in Cajun seasoning (often used interchangeably with the term “blackening seasoning”); since I was already making the seasoning from scratch, I figured this is also an opportunity to incorporate it into one of my other favorite dishes from this area, Étouffée.

Étouffée translates to “smothered” from French, which indicates that the main ingredient (often crawfish, but in this case, shrimp) is smothered in a thick sauce of broth and vegetables. Might as well add some bacon to it for good measure, because bacon.

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2015 Primal Life Kit

Hi everyone, just a quick note to let you know that my eBook, The Safe Starch Cookbook, is part of a pretty sweet bundle that became available today. The Primal Life Kit features over 55 eBooks and over 25 exclusive discounts, valued at over $1,400 altogether.

This kit is only available for the next week, so be sure to check it out!

As a reminder, here’s what you’ll find in The Safe Starch Cookbook:

  • a discussion on the historical precedence for starch consumption
  • 64 recipes (15 rice, 17 potato, 11 noodle, and 21 other starch dishes)
  • a picture for every recipe, taken by yours truly
  • comprehensive recipe index with thumbnail hyperlinks to each page
  • a look at portion sizes and meal timing for optimum health
  • tips to save money using starches (nearly $1,000/year per person!)
  • a breakdown of meal-planning in the context of carbs
  • a thorough substitution guide for common food allergies
  • all recipes are gluten-free and developed using a whole-food mindset
  • my argument for why white rice should be considered “Paleo”
  • rice-buying guide to avoid arsenic and other toxins
  • 167 pages total

Please note that by buying the kit through my link above, I receive a commission from the sale. As you may have noticed, I don’t have any ads on my site, so participating in events like this help me to pay my blogging bills! But either way, this is a resource that I feel is definitely worth your attention, or else I wouldn’t be promoting it. Thanks for your continued support.

Also, I should mention that the version of The Safe Starch Cookbook that’s part of this kit does not include a preview to Paleo Takeout – that one is sold directly through my site, right here.

You’ve heard of Samosas, right? They’re those triangle-shaped savory pastries served in Indian and Central Asian restaurants. They’re a surprisingly ancient dish, first mentioned in the Middle East (under the name Sambosa) during the 10th century before eventually making their way across Central Asia, the Indian subcontinent, and even Southeast Asia. They’re practically everywhere today – you can even find them pretty easily in South Africa, as Indian cuisine started to influence British colonial food culture.

I loved Samosas in my pre-Paleo days, and I’ve been wanting to tackle them for a while. The problem is, well, pastry. I tend not to fiddle with baked goods and leave them up to the masters (see: Jenni Hulet’s My Paleo Patisserie). So after a bit of brainstorming, I settled on the idea of Samosa-flavored mashed potatoes. I like this idea because, heck, most people are probably eating mashed potatoes anyway, so why not kick them up a notch in terms of flavor and vegetable count.

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