health

2015 may be behind us, but that certainly doesn’t mean we can’t reap the benefits of a year gone by. Case in point is the Best Paleo Recipes 2015 eBook, which is available for purchase starting today.

The book compiles six recipes each from some of the largest names in the movement, from Mark Sisson, to Danielle Walker, to Melissa Joulwan – 32 authors in all. Each contributor chose five of their favorite recipes from 2015, plus an additional recipe developed specifically for this eBook. I’m proud to say that I personally contributed six out of the 192 recipes in this book.

The book is broken down by section: appetizers, beverages, breakfast dishes, main dishes, side dishes, soups & salads, and treats & desserts. It’s just massive, nearly 500 pages in total, distributed as a PDF file – which means that you can copy it to your phone, tablet, and/or PC for easy access wherever you need it.

My contributions, pictured above, are some of my proudest moments of this past year. I’m also particularly fond of the exclusive Ratatouille recipe I developed for the book – it’s packed with flavor and comes together quite easily.

Click here to read more about the book, including a full list of contributors. Enjoy!

2015 really flew by, huh? I had quite a crazy ride over this past year: I released an eBook, a New York Times-bestselling cookbook, a smartphone/tablet app, embarked on a 12-week book tour, and welcomed our second son into the world. At the same time, this little website reached over 2.5 million readers, and a Yahoo news article about my health journey went viral.

More so than in previous years, I’ve caught myself reflecting on that fateful day in December 2010, when I first stumbled upon the ideas behind the Paleo diet. A lot has changed since then, and the movement has greatly expanded from the few forums that existed when I first changed my diet and restored my health. Here are 10 ideas on food and nutrition I’d like to share.

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Bobotie is a baked mincemeat dish and one of the more recognizable foods to come out of South Africa. It’s commonly believed that Bobotie was first derived from the Javanese dish Botok, as Dutch colonists brought the dish to South Africa from their settlements in Indonesia (née Dutch East Indies) in the 17th century. While Botok is made with minced meat wrapped in banana leaves, Bobotie is often seasoned with curry powder and dried fruit and baked with a egg custard topping – a reflection of both local ingredients and European colonial tastes.

This dish joins the ranks of other dishes on my blog, like Mulligatawny Soup and Sukuma Wiki, as exotic-tasting meals that can be created using items you likely already have in your pantry. These are some of my favorite dishes to create and share, as they have a fairly low barrier to entry but can expand your palate and culinary repertoire.

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Hi everyone, just in time for Christmas, I'm happy to announce that I have launched a smartphone app. It features all 300+ recipes from this site, organized and compiled in a beautiful, easy-to-use format. Better yet, it'll update every week with a new recipe! It works natively on tablets as well. This app has been in the works for some time, and I'm really excited to let you have a crack at it.

There are still some bugs to be worked out (for example, the ingredients aren't appearing in bullet-format yet), but I wanted to get this out to you folks now as my gift to you for the holidays.

The app is 100% FREE and available on both iOS and Android. I think it will be a great resource to consult when meal planning, grocery shopping, or in the heat of the moment while cooking. Enjoy!

As far as I can tell, one of this year’s most popular gadgets was the Instant Pot, an electronic pressure cooker that doubles (triples, etc) as a slow cooker, rice pot, steamer, yogurt maker, and more. I’m most frequently asked to develop recipes for it by my readers, followed closely by folks looking for slow cooker (crockpot) recipes. So this week’s Pot Roast recipe is the best of both worlds – a pressure cooker recipe that also includes instructions for slow cookers. Heck, I even threw in Dutch Oven instructions while I was at it.

Don’t let the lengths of these instructions scare you away. Each recipe is essentially four parts: brown the roast, cook the roast (and vegetables), broil the roast (and vegetables), and reduce the sauce. It’s a bit more involved than dumping everything in a pot, but well worth the extra effort: tender meat, roasted vegetables, and tasty sauce all at once.

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Many mornings, I wake up in the mood for eggs…but also not in the mood for eggs, you know what I mean? The consistency and flavor of traditionally-prepared eggs are both a godsend for predictability and a major exercise in patience for discerning eaters like yours truly. And it’s not just me who is sometimes bored with eggs; it’s a global pheomenon, demonstrated by the myriad of ways to prepare eggs – scrambled, fried, flipped, deviled, basted, roasted, poached, shirred, boiled, and scotched. I feel like a cast member of Forrest Gump right now, but you get my point.

Egg Bhurji is a recent favorite, as it combines exotic South Asian flavors with an egg scramble for delicious effect. All it takes is a bit of prep to chop and soften the vegetables before adding in the eggs; it’s definitely worth that extra few minutes of effort.

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UPDATE: sales have now closed, thanks to everyone for your support!

Hi everyone, I’m doing something a little different for the holidays this year. Starting today, I’m offering what I’m calling the Paleo Takeout Holiday Package. Here’s what the package will include:


  • a personalized, signed copy of Paleo Takeout, addressed to whomever you’d like with a personal message of your choice (or I can just wing it if you’d like)
  • a copy of my unreleased Paleo Takeout Secret Menu Items list, which includes 32 new dishes you can make using the existing recipes and techniques in Paleo Takeout (bringing the total recipe count of the book to nearly 300!)
  • a coupon code for a free copy of my eBook, The Safe Starch Cookbook
  • five pairs of Paleo Takeout chopsticks


In addition, you will receive an email after ordering, with links to electronic (PDF) copies of the Secret Menu Items and The Safe Starch Cookbook. That way if you want to order the Paleo Takeout Holiday Package for a friend, you’ll still get those two items for yourself!

I’m limiting the deal to only 100 packages, and I’ll be selling the packages for $40 each, with free shipping (but limited to US addresses).


Here’s how the purchase works:

  • pay for the package via this link (using PayPal or a credit card) – update: link removed
  • you’ll be redirected to a Google Form where you’ll fill out the shipping and personalization information
  • you’ll be sent an email with links to electronic copies of the Secret Menu Items list and The Safe Starch Cookbook (as well as a link to the Google Form in case you weren’t redirected automatically)
  • I’ll ship the package to the address indicated on your Google Form entry

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: Is gift-wrapping available?
A: Unfortunately, no. Gift-wrapping will require a different shipping envelope and will prohibitively increase my costs and efforts.

Q: No international shipping? What are you, some sort of a jerk?
A: Unfortunately, the shipping system we have set up doesn’t accommodate international shipping.

Q: What if I just want the Secret Menu Items list?
A: I will be offering the list at some point in the future (probably next spring), and it will be in a future printing of the book. But this will be the only way to get the Secret Menu Items for the time being. Also, please note that if you buy the package for a friend, I’ll still send you an electronic copy of the Secret Menu Items list (plus The Safe Starch Cookbook) for free.

Q: What items are on the Secret Menu?
A: First of all, it’s totally a secret, but I’ll give you an idea of what to expect: Asian-American Classics (4), Kid-Friendly Favorites (4), Southern Tastes (3), Restaurant Recreations (6), Salads and Dressings (4), More Pizzas (3), Seasoned French Fries (8). Favorites include Cheesy Garlic Bread, Hot Dog Buns, Fish & Chips, Spicy Chicken Sandwich, and Pizza Fries.

Q: How many packages can I order?
A: As many as you’d like – but please make a separate transaction for each package, thanks.

Q: How long will it take to ship?
A: It’ll take me about a week to get the package to you from the day you fill out the Google Form, so please plan accordingly.

Let me know if you have any questions in the comments below, thanks!

After first watching The LEGO Movie last year, our son Oliver started asking about the mysterious phenomenon known as “Taco Tuesday“. So we started a new tradition of what we call “Taco Bowl Tuesdays”; as you may have seen on my Instagram feed, we make them pretty regularly now. I thought it would be pretty fun to write up our Taco Bowl Tuesday recipe as a change of pace and a glimpse into our everyday lives.

The base of the recipe is simple: equal portions of seasoned ground beef, rice, and lettuce. There is some variation in which rice we use; sometimes we make Mexican Rice, and other times we make Cilantro-Lime Rice. The toppings themselves are usually a combination of what we have on hand and what we’re feeling at the moment.

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Chicken Cacciatore (Pollo alla Cacciatora) is a traditional Italian dish. The word “Cacciatora” translates to “Hunter” in English, as this dish was originally used to prepare rabbit and gamefowl. Today, variations that feature rabbit meat still abound.

The story goes that this “hunter’s stew” consisted of ingredients you could find in the forest or open fields. Many American versions of this dish have been altered considerably from their source material; breaded, fried chicken cutlets are often smothered in a marinara sauce (not unlike Chicken Parmesan, really). Italian versions often feature tomatoes but not overwhelmingly so; instead they’re a complement to other vegetables like onion, mushrooms, carrot, and bell pepper. Northern Italian variations of this dish use white wine, while Southern Italians use red wine.

Typically, this dish is prepared with a broken-down whole chicken. I’m down for that, but at the same time, I’m always concerned about the different cooking times for dark meat and finicky chicken breasts; instead, I prepared this recipe to feature thighs and drumsticks, so that everything comes together naturally.

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One of my favorite parts of moving to the South last year is that I can now dive head-first into a new food culture. For example, take today’s New Orleans-Style Barbecue Shrimp. A local friend asked me if I had tried “BBQ Shrimp” yet; I immediately thought of shrimp doused in smokey-sweet KC-style barbecue sauce, which sounded a bit weird (but not altogether terrible, honestly). My friend then explained that BBQ Shrimp here in the South is not like your typical barbecue experience. Instead, it’s a crispy shrimp dish flavored with hot sauce, butter, and rosemary, typically served as an appetizer.

Barbecue Shrimp was first popularized by Pascal’s Manale Restaurant in New Orleans during the 1950s. This dish has an “old timey” feel to it today, mostly because of its liberal use of Worcestershire sauce (made famous by Lea & Perrins back in the 1830s). The end result is a little tangy, a bit spicy, and very robust in flavor. One thing I really appreciate about this dish is that it lets the shrimp take center stage. Moreover, it’s relatively cheap to throw together once you get your hands on some high-quality shrimp (especially when you consider the fact that this dish will set you back $26 at the original restaurant!). Head-on shrimp is traditionally used, but I won’t tell on you if you use shelled shrimp.

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