recipe

Recently, I stumbled upon J. Kenji Lopez-Alt’s technique for pressure-cooker risotto, and decided to take it for a spin using my Instant Pot electric pressure cooker. Considering that risotto has been around for 600 years, it’s nice to see a new spin on a classic preparation.

This technique worked perfectly (big surprise), so I have been using it frequently as a means to make perfect risotto without all that stirring. I even had to buy a new bag of arborio rice this past weekend, which is a rare occurrence – risotto rice always seems to last forever. If you don’t have a pressure cooker (yet!), don’t worry, I’ve included stovetop instructions as well.

To highlight this new take on risotto, I decided to err on the side of decadent: duck fat, mushrooms, prosciutto, and orange zest all fit together seamlessly to form a dish that’s equal parts familiar and exotic – and surprisingly dairy-free, to boot.

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Bobotie is a baked mincemeat dish and one of the more recognizable foods to come out of South Africa. It’s commonly believed that Bobotie was first derived from the Javanese dish Botok, as Dutch colonists brought the dish to South Africa from their settlements in Indonesia (née Dutch East Indies) in the 17th century. While Botok is made with minced meat wrapped in banana leaves, Bobotie is often seasoned with curry powder and dried fruit and baked with a egg custard topping – a reflection of both local ingredients and European colonial tastes.

This dish joins the ranks of other dishes on my blog, like Mulligatawny Soup and Sukuma Wiki, as exotic-tasting meals that can be created using items you likely already have in your pantry. These are some of my favorite dishes to create and share, as they have a fairly low barrier to entry but can expand your palate and culinary repertoire.

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Hi everyone, just in time for Christmas, I'm happy to announce that I have launched a smartphone app. It features all 300+ recipes from this site, organized and compiled in a beautiful, easy-to-use format. Better yet, it'll update every week with a new recipe! It works natively on tablets as well. This app has been in the works for some time, and I'm really excited to let you have a crack at it.

There are still some bugs to be worked out (for example, the ingredients aren't appearing in bullet-format yet), but I wanted to get this out to you folks now as my gift to you for the holidays.

The app is 100% FREE and available on both iOS and Android. I think it will be a great resource to consult when meal planning, grocery shopping, or in the heat of the moment while cooking. Enjoy!

As far as I can tell, one of this year’s most popular gadgets was the Instant Pot, an electronic pressure cooker that doubles (triples, etc) as a slow cooker, rice pot, steamer, yogurt maker, and more. I’m most frequently asked to develop recipes for it by my readers, followed closely by folks looking for slow cooker (crockpot) recipes. So this week’s Pot Roast recipe is the best of both worlds – a pressure cooker recipe that also includes instructions for slow cookers. Heck, I even threw in Dutch Oven instructions while I was at it.

Don’t let the lengths of these instructions scare you away. Each recipe is essentially four parts: brown the roast, cook the roast (and vegetables), broil the roast (and vegetables), and reduce the sauce. It’s a bit more involved than dumping everything in a pot, but well worth the extra effort: tender meat, roasted vegetables, and tasty sauce all at once.

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Many mornings, I wake up in the mood for eggs…but also not in the mood for eggs, you know what I mean? The consistency and flavor of traditionally-prepared eggs are both a godsend for predictability and a major exercise in patience for discerning eaters like yours truly. And it’s not just me who is sometimes bored with eggs; it’s a global pheomenon, demonstrated by the myriad of ways to prepare eggs – scrambled, fried, flipped, deviled, basted, roasted, poached, shirred, boiled, and scotched. I feel like a cast member of Forrest Gump right now, but you get my point.

Egg Bhurji is a recent favorite, as it combines exotic South Asian flavors with an egg scramble for delicious effect. All it takes is a bit of prep to chop and soften the vegetables before adding in the eggs; it’s definitely worth that extra few minutes of effort.

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When filling out our weekly meal plan, my family often consults my cookbooks; after all, the main reason I included particular recipes in those books is because they’re our favorites. This week we decided to make the Thai Red Curry recipe from Paleo Takeout, and I thought it would be fun to share the recipe with you folks as well.

Thai Red Curry differs from other popular Thai curries in that its base is made from dried chiles instead of fresh chiles. In order to temper the considerable heat of dried Thai chiles (usually the only chili used in traditional Thai Red Curries), I use a combination of large, mild dried chiles (like Anaheim, Guajillo, or New Mexico chiles) and spicy Thai chiles. To increase the intensity of your curry, simply add more spicy chiles.

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I know what you’re thinking – two recipes in one week? That’s right folks, in anticipation of one of the biggest cooking days of the year next week, I’m providing you with 200% of my typical weekly recipe spread. Tuesday’s recipe for Devilish Eggs makes for a perfect appetizer, while this simple cranberry sauce is fitting for any Thanksgiving plate: Paleo, Primal, gluten-free, or even gluten-laden.

I’m going to be on the road for most of next week (one last family vacation before our second child arrives next month), so I want to give you a few news updates before your holiday shopping reaches full swing.

First, the Kindle version of my debut cookbook, The Ancestral Table will be on sale November 24th (this coming Tuesday) for $2.99, 66% off its normal price! This is part of a large-scale, one-day Paleo eBook sale; follow this link to sign up and be notified the moment the discount is available. Also, I’ll post the full list of eBooks on sale at the bottom of this recipe – it’s an excellent selection!

Next, the folks behind TX Bar Organics are offering 35% off all orders over $100, with free shipping on orders over $175 using the code “HOLIDAYS” (all caps). This is an excellent opportunity to fill your freezer with high-quality organic grass-fed beef.

Finally, I’ve recently started writing for Yahoo Food, which has been a lot of fun. Check out this recipe for New Brunswick-Style Potato Stuffing. This stuffing rounds out the perfect holiday meal, when paired with the cranberry sauce recipe below plus some other favorites: Devilish Eggs, Smoked Turkey, Roasted Brussels Sprouts, and Mashed Sweet Potatoes.

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When first moving to our current home in Pensacola, Florida last year, we were initially concerned with how we were going to easily do our grocery shopping. After all, living in the Baltimore/DC area had spoiled us in terms of convenience; there, you can randomly throw a stone and likely hit Trader Joe’s, Wegmans, MOM’s, Costco, or Whole Foods. But after looking at a map of Pensacola and seeing that those stores were hours away, we figured a change in shopping habits was in order. So we started to lean more heavily on a local (pricey) health food store and weekend farmer’s market, and buying bulk from online vendors like US Wellness Meats and Tendergrass Farms.

But then last weekend I visited my local grocery store, and was pleasantly surprised to find how easy it was to find relatively healthy ingredients (many of the items I would expect to find in our favorite grocery stores before moving). Organic vegetables, grass-fed and pastured meats, wild-caught seafood, full-fat dairy, and gluten-free items were plentiful. It seems like many grocery stores are starting to prioritize real foods, and it is an excellent sign.

So I decided to carry out an experiment. What if I could whip up a meal using only ingredients found in our local Publix grocery store, while still aligning to my dietary restrictions? It just so happened that I was also eager to re-tackle an old lasagna recipe from several years ago, so it all fell together nicely.

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UPDATE: sales have now closed, thanks to everyone for your support!

Hi everyone, I’m doing something a little different for the holidays this year. Starting today, I’m offering what I’m calling the Paleo Takeout Holiday Package. Here’s what the package will include:


  • a personalized, signed copy of Paleo Takeout, addressed to whomever you’d like with a personal message of your choice (or I can just wing it if you’d like)
  • a copy of my unreleased Paleo Takeout Secret Menu Items list, which includes 32 new dishes you can make using the existing recipes and techniques in Paleo Takeout (bringing the total recipe count of the book to nearly 300!)
  • a coupon code for a free copy of my eBook, The Safe Starch Cookbook
  • five pairs of Paleo Takeout chopsticks


In addition, you will receive an email after ordering, with links to electronic (PDF) copies of the Secret Menu Items and The Safe Starch Cookbook. That way if you want to order the Paleo Takeout Holiday Package for a friend, you’ll still get those two items for yourself!

I’m limiting the deal to only 100 packages, and I’ll be selling the packages for $40 each, with free shipping (but limited to US addresses).


Here’s how the purchase works:

  • pay for the package via this link (using PayPal or a credit card) – update: link removed
  • you’ll be redirected to a Google Form where you’ll fill out the shipping and personalization information
  • you’ll be sent an email with links to electronic copies of the Secret Menu Items list and The Safe Starch Cookbook (as well as a link to the Google Form in case you weren’t redirected automatically)
  • I’ll ship the package to the address indicated on your Google Form entry

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: Is gift-wrapping available?
A: Unfortunately, no. Gift-wrapping will require a different shipping envelope and will prohibitively increase my costs and efforts.

Q: No international shipping? What are you, some sort of a jerk?
A: Unfortunately, the shipping system we have set up doesn’t accommodate international shipping.

Q: What if I just want the Secret Menu Items list?
A: I will be offering the list at some point in the future (probably next spring), and it will be in a future printing of the book. But this will be the only way to get the Secret Menu Items for the time being. Also, please note that if you buy the package for a friend, I’ll still send you an electronic copy of the Secret Menu Items list (plus The Safe Starch Cookbook) for free.

Q: What items are on the Secret Menu?
A: First of all, it’s totally a secret, but I’ll give you an idea of what to expect: Asian-American Classics (4), Kid-Friendly Favorites (4), Southern Tastes (3), Restaurant Recreations (6), Salads and Dressings (4), More Pizzas (3), Seasoned French Fries (8). Favorites include Cheesy Garlic Bread, Hot Dog Buns, Fish & Chips, Spicy Chicken Sandwich, and Pizza Fries.

Q: How many packages can I order?
A: As many as you’d like – but please make a separate transaction for each package, thanks.

Q: How long will it take to ship?
A: It’ll take me about a week to get the package to you from the day you fill out the Google Form, so please plan accordingly.

Let me know if you have any questions in the comments below, thanks!

Local friends: I’ll be having a talk, cooking demo, and book signing in a couple weeks – for more info, see the bottom of this post.

This little soup has made quite a journey over its lifetime. It was traditionally a sauce served over rice in its native India, but British colonials returning to England from travels abroad in the 19th century sought to recreate the dish at home. It eventually evolved into a mildly-flavored soup and spread as far as Australia, and there are now hundreds of variations of the dish.

While coconut milk was likely the original ingredient used to add richness to the soup, cream eventually took over in the UK. Personally, I like the exotic notes that coconut milk provides, so I reverted this dish back to its roots. This soup is typically thickened by adding rice and blending it with the other ingredients, but if you’re rice-free, don’t worry about it, the soup will still have a fairly hearty thickness to it thanks to the soup’s blended sweet potato.

One of my favorite aspects of this dish is that it imparts a slightly exotic flavor while using common ingredients (much like another favorite, Sukuma Wiki). Lastly, one fun fact: the name mulligatawny is derived from the Tamil (Southern Indian) words மிளகு தண்ணீர் (mullaga and thanni), which translate to “pepper water”.

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