Curried Squash Ramen

A favorite dish from Paleo Takeout is my Ramen recipe (page 112), which contains eight different types of Ramen and a variety of add-ins. It’s an excellent way to enjoy different takes on the same soup, while sneaking in a good amount of broth at the same time.

Like a lot of North America, we’re receiving a ton of rain right now, which always puts me in the mood for soup (admittedly, it doesn’t take much for me to get in a soup-eating mood). I figure some of you might be interested in soup right about now too, so here is my take on a simple pork-based Ramen, with some added curried winter squash to celebrate the coming winter season. Both pressure cooker and stovetop instructions are provided.

Ramen is a Japanese noodle dish inspired by Chinese cuisine (the word Ramen itself is borrowed from Lāmiàn, a type of Chinese noodle). Ramen is a relatively new phenomenon; it first started appearing in Japan during the early 20th century, but quickly gained ground after World War II, when soldiers returning from war in China had developed an affinity for Chinese-inspired cuisine (namely noodle soups). At the same time, Japan started importing American-grown wheat flour, which spurred the Japanese noodle-making industry. Ramen’s popularity was secured in 1958 when instant ramen noodles were invented, and later exported starting in 1971.

The impressive reach of Japanese Ramen can be neatly summarized by one fact: it has become very popular in China, where it is called Rìshì Lāmiàn (“Japan-style Lāmiàn”). That the soup can originate in one country, gain prominence in another, only to return to the original country with a new identity is both a testament to how delicious this soup is, as well as the ingenuity and adaptability of the human spirit.

Curried Squash Ramen (Gluten-free, Paleo, Primal, Perfect Health Diet)

  • Servings: 4
  • Time: 1.5 to 2.5 hours
  • Difficulty: Easy

For the pork broth:
1 tbsp coconut oil or lard
2 lbs pork with bones (country-style ribs, necks, hocks), cut into large chunks (see note below)
2 quarts water
1 sheet kombu seaweed
2 tbsp fish sauce
2 tbsp tamari or coconut aminos
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar

For the squash:
1 lb peeled winter squash (acorn or similar), cut into bite-sized chunks
1 tsp Japanese curry powder
1 tsp mild curry powder
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1 tbsp olive oil

For the ramen:
1/2 lb (dry) rice noodles, 1/2 lb (dry) sweet potato noodles, 3 spiralized zucchinis, or 1 lb kelp noodles (see #3 below)
1/2 lb Chinese cabbage (bok choy, choy sum, or won bok), chopped
chopped chives to garnish

1. Instant Pot instructions: Add the coconut oil and press the “Saute” button; warm the oil until shimmering, about 2 minutes, then add the pork pieces, in batches if needed to avoid overcrowding the pot. Brown on each side until dark and crispy, about 3 minutes per side. Once everything has been browned, add 2 quarts (8 cups) water plus the kombu, fish sauce, tamari, and ACV. Cover and press the “Soup” button and set for 35 minutes. Once it has finished cooking, allow it to sit at the “Warm” setting for 15-20 minutes before removing the lid. You want to avoid force-depressurizing (twisting the knob at top) as much as possible, as it will alter the texture of your pork, so that’s why I let it sit for a while before depressurizing. Strain the pork pieces into a different stockpot to catch the broth (discard the kombu(; once the pork is cool, pick the meat apart, cover it, and set aside until you’re ready to use it. Keep the strained broth warm over med/low heat and add salt to taste.

2. Stovetop instructions: Warm the coconut oil in a stockpot over medium/high heat until shimmering, about 1 minute, then add the pork pieces, in batches if needed to avoid overcrowding the pot. Brown on each side until dark and crispy, about 3 minutes per side. Once everything has been browned, add 2 quarts (8 cups) water plus the kombu, fish sauce, tamari, and ACV. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to low; simmer until the pork is tender, about 2 hours. Strain the pork pieces into a different stockpot to catch the broth (discard the kombu); once the pork is cool, pick the meat apart, cover it, and set aside until you’re ready to use it. Keep the strained broth warm over med/low heat and add salt to taste.

3. While the broth simmers, prepare the noodles. Rice noodles: soak in warm water for 30 minutes, then dip in boiling water until soft, about 30 seconds; strain and rinse in cold water until cool to the touch. Sweet potato noodles: add to boiling water, and simmer until you can bite through it somewhat easily (think al dente), about 6 minutes; strain and rinse in cold water until cool to the touch. Spiralized zucchini: spiralize then dip in boiling water until soft, about 10 seconds, then strain and gently rinse in cold water; strain again then wrap up in cloth and gently squeeze about half of its liquid. Kelp noodles: no preparation needed.

4. Prepare the curried squash so that it’s ready when the rest of the soup is ready (it’ll take about 35 minutes, so time accordingly). Preheat your oven to 400F. Combine the peeled squash, curry powders, salt, and oil in a mixing bowl and toss until evenly combined. Scatter in a single layer on a baking sheet and roast until tender, about 25 minutes, flipping halfway through; set the oven to broil for the last 2 minutes to get a nice color on the squash.

5. Let’s put it all together. Distribute the noodles into four bowls, then add the pork, squash, and garnishes. For the Chinese cabbage, throw it in the broth and par-boil it for a few seconds, until limp and bright green, then fish out with tongs and distribute into bowls (we use a noodle strainer to make it easy). Once you have your bowls prepared, bring the broth to a boil then ladle it into the bowls. Garnish with chives and serve.

** If you already have some pork, beef, or chicken broth on hand, this recipe can be made even more easily. Add 2 quarts broth to a stockpot (or 1 quart broth and 1 quart water if the broth is strong/concentrated), add the kombu, fish sauce, tamari, and ACV, then simmer for 30 minutes while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. Strain the broth and taste it for salt before serving.

** When selecting pork, the most important part is the presence of bones. The meat is there to add flavor to the broth, with an added bonus of eating it afterwards. So use anything you can find – even bone-in pork chops will do fine.

** Why two different curry powders? Good question. S&B curry powder gives a distinctly Japanese curry flavor, but is quite spicy. Tempering it with a mild curry allows you to enjoy the flavor without all of the heat. If you’re a fan of spicy, just use S&B, no worries.

** Feel free to go crazy with different additions to the ramen: hard-boiled egg, carrot ribbons, mushrooms, bean sprouts, you name it. You can also flavor the broth as you wish: a 1 tbsp of red miso paste, or a dollop of butter or lard may sound crazy, but are often used in different regional ramens throughout Japan. Throwing a couple dried mushrooms (especially shiitake) into the broth when you add the kombu is not a bad idea, either.

** You’ll likely have leftover broth, which is perfect for freezing and using for future ramens.

This Ramen is pictured with sweet potato noodles, but it’s equally delicious with any of the other noodle options provided above.

22 thoughts on “Curried Squash Ramen

  1. I’ve never tried, acv, coconut aminos, and fish sauce together but that combination sounds like it would really stimulate that saltiness of coconut aminos. I recently spiralized a radish into noodles and it pairs with Asian themed food well. You must send rain my way since I’m in Texas and we’re switching from dry cold to dry hot every day. Thanks for the recipe =)

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  2. Could the Instant pot instructions be used for making the other ramen recipes in Paleo Takeout? It would be great to save time with the pressure cooker.

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    1. Hi Josh, you could most definitely use this broth for other Ramen recipes, but the ramen broth in Paleo Takeout is actually faster than this recipe – it is a dashi-based broth that requires simmering for only 30 minutes. But you could also do a hybrid of the two – brown some pork (or chicken) in the Instant Pot, then through the dashi ingredients in the pot and pressure-cook them for 30 minutes. Hope that helps!

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  3. Thanks for sharing both instructions on the same recipe on this blog. It is convenient so I know which step to follow. I am intrigued to try this recipe this weekend; I haven’t encountered a ramen recipe that calls for apple cider vinegar as an ingredient!

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  4. Man, I love how the noodles look so tasty in the photo! I was just surfing the site of my friendand saw this – it made me crave for ramen. I will try to make this tomorrow but wondering what Japanese curry you used? Any brand?

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  5. This turned out soooooo delicious!! By the time I got around to making it, the pork I had purchased had gone bad, but I (luckily) happened to have some beef short ribs on hand and used them instead. As recommended, I added dried shitake to the broth at the same time as the kombu, and the broth was amazing! I am so excited that I now have the option to make ramen (one of my favorite things from my trips to Japan). I only had one type of curry, and it still was very tasty. Thanks, Russ, for sharing this. I can’t wait to make it again! (and actually try it with the pork!)

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  6. I have been making this ramen since you originally posted it, and let me say, it’s amazing! Do you think using sweet potato noodles, that it would freeze okay? I was going to experiment, but I’d hate to waste any that I have made! Also, (I say this not having purchased your paleo takeout book yet) but for the love, please, can you whip up another Ramen recipe like this with maybe beef or chicken??? Thanks for all the yummy recipes! My family and I have ‘domestic man weekly menus’ all the time!

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