Pressure Cooker Pot Roast

As far as I can tell, one of this year’s most popular gadgets was the Instant Pot, an electronic pressure cooker that doubles (triples, etc) as a slow cooker, rice pot, steamer, yogurt maker, and more. I’m most frequently asked to develop recipes for it by my readers, followed closely by folks looking for slow cooker (crockpot) recipes. So this week’s Pot Roast recipe is the best of both worlds – a pressure cooker recipe that also includes instructions for slow cookers. Heck, I even threw in Dutch Oven instructions while I was at it.

Don’t let the lengths of these instructions scare you away. Each recipe is essentially four parts: brown the roast, cook the roast (and vegetables), broil the roast (and vegetables), and reduce the sauce. It’s a bit more involved than dumping everything in a pot, but well worth the extra effort: tender meat, roasted vegetables, and tasty sauce all at once.

Pictured: the meat after it’s been browned and added to the braising liquid.

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast (Paleo, Primal, Whole30 adaptable, Gluten-Free, Perfect Health Diet)

  • Servings: 4-8
  • Time: 1 hour 45 minutes (Instant Pot), 4 hours (Dutch Oven), 5-9 hours (Slow Cooker)
  • Difficulty: Easy

2-3 lbs boneless chuck roast (3-4 lbs bone-in)
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
2 tbsp ghee
1 small yellow onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1 tbsp tomato paste
1 cup beef broth
1 cup chicken broth
1/4 cup red wine (1 tbsp red wine vinegar for Whole30)
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce (fish sauce okay)

1 1/2 lbs red potatoes, cut into bit-sized chunks
1 lb carrots, cut into bite-sized chunks
8oz white mushrooms, cut in half
salt and pepper to taste

Instant Pot Instructions:

1. Season the roast liberally with salt and pepper. Add the ghee to the Instant Pot and press the “Sauté” button; wait for the ghee to heat up, about 2 minutes, then add the roast. Brown on one side, about 6 minutes, then flip and brown the other side, about 6 more minutes (you’ll know when each side is browned when it pulls easily from the stainless-steel pot). Remove the roast and set aside. Add the onion and sauté until softened, about 4 minutes, stirring often. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and stir together until aromatic, about 30 seconds; add the broths, wine, and Worcestershire sauce. Stir to combine and bring to a simmer, then add the roast and any accumulated juices.

2. Cover the Instant Pot and Press the “Stew/Meat” button, and set it on high pressure for 45 minutes. Once finished, the Instant Pot will automatically shift to “Keep Warm”; allow it to stay at that setting for 10 minutes, then use the quick-release valve on the lid to force-depressurize the rest.

3. Remove the lid and transfer the roast to a rimmed baking sheet and set aside. Add the potatoes, carrots, and mushrooms to the Instant Pot, re-cover with the lid, and set to “Stew/Meat” on high pressure for 6 minutes. As the vegetables cook, place the roast in the oven and broil until the top of the roast is crispy and some of its fat renders, about 4 minutes. Remove the roast and transfer it to a cutting board; loosely tent with tin foil to keep warm. Once the vegetables are finished, use the quick-release valve on the lid to force-depressurize the Instant Pot. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the vegetables to the baking sheet. Press the “Sauté” button on the Instant Pot to simmer, uncovered, and reduce the liquid; as that happens, place the vegetables in the oven and broil until browned, about 5 minutes, flipping and jostling the vegetables every couple of minutes.

4. Slice the roast and place it on a platter; add the vegetables to the platter. Once the liquid has reduced by about half, taste it and add salt and pepper as needed, then pour some of it over the roast and vegetables. Serve immediately with the sauce as a gravy.

Dutch Oven Instructions:

1. Preheat your oven to 325F. Season the roast liberally with salt and pepper. Heat the ghee in a Dutch Oven over medium-high heat until shimmering, about 2 minutes. Add the roast and brown on one side, about 6 minutes, then flip and brown the other side, about 6 more minutes (you’ll know when each side is browned when it pulls easily from the Dutch Oven). Remove the roast and set aside. Reduce heat to medium and add the onion and sauté until softened, about 4 minutes, stirring often. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and stir together until aromatic, about 30 seconds; add the broths, wine, and Worcestershire sauce. Stir to combine and bring to a simmer, then add the roast and any accumulated juices; cover the Dutch Oven and place in the oven and roast until it’s nearly tender, about 3 hours.

2. Once the roast is nearly tender, add the potatoes, carrots, and mushrooms to the Dutch Oven; roast until the vegetables are just tender, about 10 minutes. Carefully remove the roast and vegetables from the Dutch Oven and transfer to a rimmed baking sheet. Place the Dutch Oven on the stovetop and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat; simmer until reduced by half, about 10 minutes.

3. As the sauce reduces, add the baking sheet to the oven and broil until the top of the roast is crispy and the vegetables are browned, about 5 minutes, flipping and jostling the vegetables every couple of minutes. Remove the roast and transfer it to a cutting board; allow to rest for 10 minutes. Transfer the vegetables to a platter and loosely tent with tin foil to keep warm.

4. Slice the roast and place it on a platter; add the vegetables to the platter. Once the liquid has reduced by about half, taste it and add salt and pepper as needed, then pour some of it over the roast and vegetables. Serve immediately with the sauce as a gravy.

Slow Cooker (Crockpot) Instructions:

1. Season the roast liberally with salt and pepper. Heat the ghee in a skillet over medium-high heat until shimmering, about 2 minutes. Add the roast and brown on one side, about 6 minutes, then flip and brown the other side, about 6 more minutes. Remove the roast and set aside. Reduce heat to medium and add the onion and sauté until softened, about 4 minutes, stirring often. Add the garlic and tomato paste, and stir together until aromatic, about 30 seconds; add the broths, wine, and Worcestershire sauce. Stir to combine, then transfer to a slow cooker; add the roast and any accumulated juices. Cover the slow cooker and cook until the roast is nearly tender, about 8 hours on low or 4 hours on high.

2. Once the roast is nearly tender, add the potatoes, carrots, and mushrooms to the slow cooker; increase the heat to high and simmer until the vegetables are just tender, about 10 minutes. Carefully remove the roast and vegetables from the slow cooker and transfer to a rimmed baking sheet. Transfer the sauce to a saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat; simmer until reduced by half, about 10 minutes.

3. As the sauce reduces, add the baking sheet to the oven and broil until the top of the roast is crispy and the vegetables are browned, about 5 minutes, flipping and jostling the vegetables every couple of minutes. Remove the roast and transfer it to a cutting board; allow to rest for 10 minutes. Transfer the vegetables to a platter and loosely tent with tin foil to keep warm.

4. Slice the roast and place it on a platter; add the vegetables to the platter. Once the liquid has reduced by about half, taste it and add salt and pepper as needed, then pour some of it over the roast and vegetables. Serve immediately with the sauce as a gravy.

** This method can be used with the Instant Pot’s “Slow Cooker” function, and you’ll be able to save on dishes by not having to use a skillet or saucepan; simply use the “Sauté” button on the Instant Pot for those two steps.

42 thoughts on “Pressure Cooker Pot Roast

    1. I hope you have better luck with your instant pot experience than I did. Mine is a lemon , customer service wants ME to run tests on it. I just want them to send me a replacement, I bought it after multiple suggestions from bloggers😡😡

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  1. Love this Russ! What a nice present from you, and I love that you’ve provided all 3 methods in your instructions.
    I’ve had my IP for a couple of months now, and like many before me have said: why did I wait so long?! The stocks from it are superior to stovetop in every way. So far I’ve even made (both slow cooked and pressure cooked) pumpkin pie steel cut oatmeal (for my hubby), crustless pumpkin pies in ramekins, and last night a cheesecake. That trivet is awesome for steam “baking”. I can’t wait to try this recipe in it! A good pot roast is hard to beat and your versions look fantastic!

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  2. The great thing about Russ Crandall is that you can email him and he’ll respond, if you have any questions, regarding the timing.

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  3. I am planning to make this in my instant pot on a very snowy day in PA! Quick question – should I put this on the trivet to cook or directly on the bottom of the pot? Thanks for the wonderful recipe!

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  4. So, this recipe was fantastic, but next time I won’t broil the meat at the end. It dried out my perfectly beautiful and moist roast. I look forward to doing this recipe again without that step :-)

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    1. Hi Callie, sorry for taking so long to reply – sorry to hear that the broiler step didn’t work out! I think it’s a matter of judgement at that point – if the roast still has a lot of fat and connective tissue, broiling will melt it and crisp the outside of the roast a bit. But if the roast already looks great at that point, you can likely skip that last step. Thanks for the feedback!

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  5. This looks really great! I am looking forward to using the pressure cooker to do this recipe. Thanks for your dedication to sharing great food recipes.

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  6. Made it tonight for the family. I’m the only one doing Whole 30 but cook W30 for everyone. They loved it. Beautiful flavors and textures.

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    1. You’re simply searing the meat, you could use anything you normally use to sear meats. Ghee is good since the milk solids were removed so it has a higher smoke point, but you could use your preferred meat-frying oil as well. No idea how any of that falls into things like paleo though.

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  7. Oh shoot. This is my first time using my pressure cooker. I think I already messed up. I didn’t realize you could use it with the kid off. Looks like I was not to put the lid on until after broth, adding roast back in. Also, I have different settings than mentioned. I don’t have an option for high pressure so I selected meat/chicken and added time adjustment to 45 minutes. I should have read my “power cooker plus” instruction manual first but dang it, we have to eat by 530 since we have plans tonight. Who has time for owners manuals? Lol. Thanks for the recipe. I’m anxious to see how it turns out.

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  8. Made this tonight and while the veggies and sauce were delicious, the roast was very dried out. Might have been my fault for using a rump roast, but if not, it could’ve been the broiler step as well as letting it sit out while the veggies cooked and roasted. It also had a lot of fat inside of it that didn’t render.

    Thoughts?

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    1. Rump roast is much leaner and lacks the connective tissue that is found in chuck; therefore it has a smaller window of tenderness (chuck is pretty forgiving). My rule of thumb is that the less marbled the beef, the more access I want to have to it – so I would suggest using the Dutch Oven or Crockpot method above instead of pressure cooking, that way you can check it with a fork for tenderness as it cooks. Because it’s leaner, I would also skip the broiler step and be sure to cover it as it rests. Hope that helps!

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    2. I made this recipe today,in my instant pot, it really was delicious, the meat was still tough though, next time I will cook it longer, perhaps 1 hour.

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    1. My rules with pot roast: If the meat is not tender but not dried out, it was likely undercooked. If it’s not tender and also dried out (with a mealy texture), it was likely overcooked. From the sounds of it, it was undercooked. A good way to check is to poke it with a fork once the pressure cooker is depressurized and you can take the lid off – if there is still a lot of resistance (it feels more like stabbing a steak than a roast), pop the cover back on and cook it for another 10 minutes, then check it again. If the veggies are tender but the meat isn’t, I would fish them out, cover them, and pop them in an insulated space (I use the microwave) to keep warm/moist while you finish the roast off. Pressure cooking times can vary based on the size of the roast, the amount of liquid/veggies in the pot, or the presence/size of a bone in the roast!

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  9. Thanks, Russ, for all this information, and comparisons!
    I have all three appliances, although I’ve yet to try the instant potmethod. I have such good luck with the Dutch oven that I’m hesitant to change.

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  10. I’m like Debra: I have all 3, but love to make classic dishes like this “old school” style, in a Le Creuset Dutch Oven. It just feels so earthy, nostalgic and traditional to me — it just makes me happy to use the beautiful thing.

    If I ever need to bring it to an event or function and either warm it up or keep it warm there, then the IP would be my go-to.

    But I really appreciate that there are tons of folks who are much busier with me and need to have things cooking faster because of child-rearing, other work, or scheduling constraints.

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  11. This recipe was easy to follow and worth every step. I used the instant pot method and timing was spot on. The aroma filled the house and the flavor was fantastic. Thank you so much for a fabulous recipe.

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  12. Great recipe Russ. Thank you. As a newbie to the pressure cooker, your take on pot roast was just my fourth time using the cooker. It came out just it was pictured and described here, delicious. I added a bit of savory to mine, some dried rosemary and thyme herbs. I think the next time I make it I might reduce the cooking time from 45 minutes to 30 to 35 minutes, as I like my roast beef more medium cooked, with some pink in the middle.

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  13. Great flavor. My meat was not tender in my Instapot?? Worcestershire Sauce has sugar in it, so not whole 30 compliant if you use it. I will try this again. Any suggestions to make the meat fall apart. Should I have put it back in?

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